I Love the Night: 1979’s Dracula and Sepulchral Seduction — VHS Revival

The 1970s was a curious time for the world’s most famous vampire, Count Dracula, who was originally created by Bram Stoker in his classic 1897 novel of the same name. Despite ruling the screen for over a decade thanks to Christopher Lee’s iconic turn, Hammer’s incarnation of the character had now been exhausted to the point where, for their last three outings, he had been depicted as savaging London’s modern-day, hot-pants wearing youth, going undercover as an estate agent (!!!) and, rather wonderfully, stumbling into the martial arts genre. Elsewhere, the character had undergone Blaxploitation overhauls in Blacula and its sequel Scream, Blacula, Scream, and had entered the wilfully tragi-comic arena of the absurd with Paul Morrissey and Andy Warhol’s Blood for Dracula.

via I Love the Night: 1979’s Dracula and Sepulchral Seduction — VHS Revival

ViaVHS Revival-Time to Join the Club: How The Lost Boys Started My Fascination with Horror

Which film or TV programme scared you the most as a child? Which did you watch at too young an age, was the one that made you run out of the room when it all became too much? There are a few strong contenders for me – The Company of Wolves, Episode 3 of Doctor Who’s ‘The Greatest Show in the Galaxy’, Superman III and so on – but the one that takes the top spot was a film that not many would regard as a seriously scary horror, a film that proudly showcased itself partly as a comedy. It wasn’t even an ’18’. It was The Lost Boys […]

via Time to Join the Club: How The Lost Boys Started My Fascination with Horror — VHS Revival