Via Grindhouse Theology-Summer of Impositions II: Killing in the Name: Pandemics, Policing, & Patriarchy in Parasite (1982) & The Bride (2013) [Trevor]

Some of those that work forces, are the same that burn crosses. – “Killing in the Name”, Rage Against the Machine (1991) It’s getting so a fella can’t get away from the…sickies no more. -Buddy, Parasite (1982) Put away your Pumpkin Spice Lattes. While you have been displaying decorative gourds and positioning plastic pumpkins, I […]

Summer of Impositions II: [Trevor]: Killing in the Name: Pandemics, Policing, and Patriarchy in Parasite (1982) and The Bride (2013) — Grindhouse Theology

Via Grindhouse Theology-Summer of Impositions II: The Banality of Bleh: An Autopsy on Drive-In Massacre (1976) & Astro-Zombies (1968)[Ian]

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Blake Collier is one of the men I most look up to: loyal, self-giving, insightful, possessed of wry wit, absolutely dedicated to his family, eager to learn, to excavate beneath the layers of the given. There are times, though, I wonder if Blake likes me all that much. Because the movies he imposed on me […]

Summer of Impositions II: [IAN] The Banality of Bleh: An Autopsy on Drive-In Massacre (1976) and Astro-Zombies (1968) — Grindhouse Theology

Via Grindhouse Theology-Summer of Impositions II: [Caleb] Why Are There Ants in Here?: On House at the End of the Street (2012) & Them! (1954)

I suppose if there are any connections to be made in these films, it’s the age-old warnings of generational sins haunting our descendants. Whether it’s our personal desires for dangerous people that seep into the hearts of our children, leading them to destruction, or it’s our society desires for dominance that place our children in harm’s way, I guess the overall theme is that “what’s done in the dark will be brought to the light.”

via Summer of Impositions II: [Caleb] Why Are There Ants in Here?: On House at the End of the Street (2012) & Them! (1954) — Grindhouse Theology

Via Grindhouse Theology-On God, And Bears, And Dads: ‘Come To Daddy’ [Ryan]

Come to Daddy doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. I think that’s the point. Without spoiling too terribly much, suffice it to say that Come to Daddy is about a rich young doofus traveling to meet his estranged father for the first time in thirty years and finding that there is something deeply, horrifically […]

via [Ryan] On God, And Bears, And Dads: ‘Come To Daddy’ — Grindhouse Theology

Via Grindhouse Theology-Grindhouse’s Social Distancing Movie Extravaganza

We here at Grindhouse Theology want to manifest graced solidarity with our readers and fellow horror fans by sharing some of the films that have kept us sane during the current quarantine period. The social distancing protocols we’ve all had to put into effect have been hard on us all, but the remarkable thing many […]

via Grindhouse’s Social Distancing Movie Extravaganza — Grindhouse Theology

Via Grindhouse Theology-The Bad Seed & the Doom of Our Lineage [McKenna]

“Daddy … whose child am I?” That gutting question cuts to the existential heart of The Bad Seed, a 1956 dramatic black-and-white thriller starring Nancy Kelly and Patty McCormack known to many now for its camp quality. An adaptation of a book by the same title, the film is one of the earliest to shape […]

via [McKenna] The Bad Seed and the Doom of Our Lineage — Grindhouse Theology

Via Grindhouse Theology ‘Climax’: Grasping At The City Of God [Ryan]

Climax is a vision of hell, more or less, and arguably a much better one than those ubiquitous productions of Heaven’s Gates, Hell’s Flames that played in churches throughout America at the tail end of the 20th century. “One’s neighbor is for them not only a potential helper or sexual object, but also someone who […]

via [Ryan] ‘Climax’: Grasping At The City Of God — Grindhouse Theology

Via Grindhouse Theology-I See Through a Mirror Dimly, A Screen Darkly: Or, A Brief Reflection on Technology

“There was a child went forth every day, And the first object he look’d upon, that object he became.” – Walt Whitman “We come to see ourselves differently as we catch sight of our images in the mirror of the machine.” These opening words to Sherry Turkle’s 1995 book Life on the Screen highlight a […]

via I See Through a Mirror Dimly, A Screen Darkly: Or, A Brief Reflection on Technology — Grindhouse Theology

[Caleb] Let’s Make Man in Our Image, & Let’s Scare Jessica to Death (1971) — Grindhouse Theology

Which brings me back to the topic at hand—that Let’s Scare Jessica to Death (1971) is a dramatic and distinctively American re-imagining of the Garden of Eden story that reveals how our progressive age is just as barbaric as the antediluvian world we encounter in Christian Scripture. And part of what drew my attention to this was the strange fact that Jessica (Zohra Lampert) reminds me so much of my own mother! The suffering of the former compelled me to revisit the situation of the latter. So the question I want to wrestle with here is what does Jessica have to do with Eve?

via [Caleb] Let’s Make Man in Our Image, & Let’s Scare Jessica to Death (1971) — Grindhouse Theology

Via Grindhouse Theology-Us: A Dark Easter [Radha]

***SPOILER ALERT*** Continue at your own risk. God brought them together. The Messiah taught them the glory of the light. The Messiah taught them how to live in the light. The Messiah taught them how to kill their old selves and take their place in the world as newly born. The Messiah brought them […]

via [Radha] Us: A Dark Easter — Grindhouse Theology