Via Grindhouse Theology-I Can’t See Where I’m Going, But I’ll Walk There Anyway: The Eschatology of Bird Box [Chris]

*Spoiler alert* Over the past few years, the streaming behemoth Netflix has been investing a lot of time and financial resources into their original programming. From series to stand-up comedy specials to full-length films, Netflix has provided its viewers with a steady stream of new content to keep them busy for quite a while. In […]

via [Chris] I Can’t See Where I’m Going, But I’ll Walk There Anyway: The Eschatology of Bird Box — Grindhouse Theology

Via Grindhouse Theology-Our Holy Book is a Horror Story: A Reflection on Christians and Horror Films [Chris]

I have been a fan of horror films since I was a young kid. If memory serves me correctly, the first horror film I ever saw was The Exorcist. It seemed to me, even then, there was something more here, something which allowed for further exploration. Even as a young kid, albeit in a very […]

via [Chris] Our Holy Book is a Horror Story: A Reflection on Christians and Horror Films — Grindhouse Theology

Via Grindhouse Theology – The Horror of Modern Life Between Alien and Aliens

In the past month or so, I’ve been obsessing over the Alien series. When the Alien movies are good, they are very good, but that success never comes in the focus on the perfect killing machine, the titular alien. I, for one, have never been that enchanted by the alien itself. When the Alien movies […]

via [Samuel] The Horror of Modern Life Between Alien and Aliens — Grindhouse Theology

Via Grindhouse Theology [Fred] Father of the Corn, But Not of the Year: Stephen King’s “1922”

What’s with you and corn, Stephen King? You got something against grains when they’re especially tall? In 1922, a movie from 2017 based on a novella by Stephen King, a farmer spends a lot of time in his corn field. Doing weird stuff. Were this Children of the Corn, you would know what I mean […]

via [Fred] Father of the Corn, But Not of the Year: Stephen King’s “1922” — Grindhouse Theology

Truth-Telling for Unreliable Narrators: Reflections on Jennifer Lynch’s ‘Surveillance’ — Grindhouse Theology

Jennifer Lynch’s Surveillance is filled with unreliable narrators, and in that sense its characters are relatable. A fairly brief movie, at least one half of the narrative spans approximately fifteen minutes, played on repeat, through the eyes of several different characters. So it’s a bit like Kurosawa’s Rashomon, which, regrettably, I haven’t seen, and Mario […]

via Truth-Telling for Unreliable Narrators: Reflections on Jennifer Lynch’s ‘Surveillance’ — Grindhouse Theology