I Love the Night: 1979’s Dracula and Sepulchral Seduction — VHS Revival

The 1970s was a curious time for the world’s most famous vampire, Count Dracula, who was originally created by Bram Stoker in his classic 1897 novel of the same name. Despite ruling the screen for over a decade thanks to Christopher Lee’s iconic turn, Hammer’s incarnation of the character had now been exhausted to the point where, for their last three outings, he had been depicted as savaging London’s modern-day, hot-pants wearing youth, going undercover as an estate agent (!!!) and, rather wonderfully, stumbling into the martial arts genre. Elsewhere, the character had undergone Blaxploitation overhauls in Blacula and its sequel Scream, Blacula, Scream, and had entered the wilfully tragi-comic arena of the absurd with Paul Morrissey and Andy Warhol’s Blood for Dracula.

via I Love the Night: 1979’s Dracula and Sepulchral Seduction — VHS Revival

20 Favourite Horrors of 2019 — Movie Reviews 101

2019 has been one of the best years for horror, I have found myself enjoying most of the horrors this year, this is just going to be the ones I enjoyed the most in no particular order. There will be a few films missing off this list, first The Lighthouse, which hasn’t been released in […]

via 20 Favourite Horrors of 2019 — Movie Reviews 101

Via B&S About Movies-Tobe Hooper Does Star Wars: Lifeforce (1985)

Author’s Note: This review previously posted on September 11, 2017, as part of our “Tobe Hooper Week” to commorate the life and career of the late director who left us on August 26. Thanks to Disney Studios and their release of Star Wars: Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker, we can remember Tobe once […]

via Tobe Hooper Does Star Wars: Lifeforce (1985) — B&S About Movies

Via Grindhouse Theology-The Bad Seed & the Doom of Our Lineage [McKenna]

“Daddy … whose child am I?” That gutting question cuts to the existential heart of The Bad Seed, a 1956 dramatic black-and-white thriller starring Nancy Kelly and Patty McCormack known to many now for its camp quality. An adaptation of a book by the same title, the film is one of the earliest to shape […]

via [McKenna] The Bad Seed and the Doom of Our Lineage — Grindhouse Theology